Monday, January 12, 2015

Roses For The Rain

In her bed she turns her face,
And from the window comes the sun.
She opens her eyes and is blinded.
And there the days starts with her and pain being one.


She takes the hottest showers,
Wishing she could disappear through the drain.
She steps out clean but not yet cleansed.
She will plant roses for the rain.


Rational about her fate,
This is something that can't truly last.
To tend a growing future,
You must prune a decaying past.


Cold morning-dirt between her toes,
And a shovel in her hands,
The dull thudding of her heart is back,
But she has other plans.


For she is working in her garden,
Part of the emotionally lame,
Standing in the morning light,
Planting roses for the rain.


***


I was at work when I got a weird phrase in my head. It was the last stanza of the poem. I felt I should write it down before it left forever, but I didn't know what to do with it. Then I got bored one day and started looking through prompts I had written in a DIY art journal of mine. One of them said to write a poem so I did...obviously. I think this is the first poem I've written in about 5-6 years.


I'm glad I only had one part of a sheet of paper to write it on because this was going to be so much longer. The original stanza that popped into my head was:


"You can see her standing there,
Part of the emotionally lame,
Standing in the enveloping dusk,
Planting roses for the rain."


I was going to follow this chick through her whole day and all this shit. There was originally going to be a line about her putting sugar in her coffee just to get some sweetness back in her day. I'm glad I held back though. For a poem that's supposed to be positive that original stanza sounds so fucking negative. 'Enveloping dusk' still kind of sounds like you're succumbing to the negative thoughts unlike 'morning light'. It's a lot brighter, pardon the pun.

2 comments:

  1. Don't you just love how these random story(or poem) fragments appear in your mind, and you have no idea what to do with them but you know that you can do something with them ... ? Good thing you saved that stanza.

    "To tend a growing future,
    You must prune a decaying past."

    That's a great line right there. You sure you haven't written poetry in years? :D

    I think you made the right choice, with the length and the 'morning light'. It's brighter, yes, but it also flows better. (Ha ha...I sound like I know what I'm talking about.) I had thought about making my poem longer - but that pretty much said all I wanted it to. "omit needless words" and all...

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    Replies
    1. I love it yes, but sometimes it's also somewhat annoying when they won't stop. Although that might be some blessing/curse type deal. But I generally love it. It's a feeling of 'Now what is this about?' that I love.

      Thank you so much! I am rather proud of that line. haha. I'm sure I haven't, lol. It's one of the things I lamented the most. :p

      Absolutely agreed. Don't make it longer than it really has to be unless there's a reason. Sometimes it's just better shortened. ^_^

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